Monthly Archives: July 2012

Bighorn Peak via Icehouse Canyon

Bighorn Peak is a very adventurous hike that is located between Ontario and Cucamonga Peaks. Bighorn Peak stands at 8441 feet above sea level and offers great views of the Inland Empire, towards Santiago Peak, and the High Desert, although, not as great views as Telegraph and Cucamonga Peaks offer. The most common way to get to Bighorn is to take the Icehouse Canyon Trail, and, once you get to the Icehouse Saddle, you will head South following the sign that says Ontario Peak and Kelly’s Camp. After about 1.5 miles, you will reach a ridge. There is a sign on a set of rocks that points to Ontario Peak to the right at 1 mile, but, it is actually about 1.4, and points to Bighorn Peak to the left at 3/4 of a mile, but, that is actually about 1 mile. The last part of the climb to Bighorn Peak is pretty steep and is a bit of a scramble, but, overall, there should not be any problems in reaching the top. There is a register that you can sign once you get there. Bighorn Peak offers a great trek, but, a lot of hikers prefer the neighbors such as Ontario, Cucamonga, and Telegraph Peaks. Reaching Bighorn isn’t as tough as the previously mentioned, but, it is still a pretty strenuous 3500 foot climb with about a 12 mile round trip. I was very intrigued with the scenery of this Trek, especially after the Icehouse Saddle, and I found myself taking many, many pictures.

Danilo holding the register at the summit of Bighorn Peak.

Once you reach the saddle at Icehouse after the 2600 foot gain in 3.6 miles, the elevation levels out for a mile or so as you reach Kelly’s Camp(which used to be a mountain resort), but, after Kelly’s Camp, the trail begins the ascension towards the ridge. The elevation gain to Bignorn Peak is about about 900 feet after the saddle in about 2.4 miles, so, it is a moderate climb at that point as most of the elevation you will have gained will be from the Icehouse Canyon Trailhead to the Icehouse Saddle. Once you reach that ridge between Ontario and Bighorn, you will get excellent views towards Santiago Peak and everything in between. It is a magnificent walk on that ridge whether you head to Ontario or Bighorn. I was also fortunate enough to run into a set of about eight Bighorn Sheep twice; just past Kelly’s Camp on the way up, and once again past Kelly’s Camp on the way down. The only negative thing about this hike was that as soon as I got out of my car at the Trailhead, I busted my ankle and it was a pretty bad one(very swollen). I managed to walk it off a bit and was able to complete the entire hike, which was a very foolish things to do, but, my motto is: as long as I can walk, I am game. Overall, this was an awesome Trek and I would highly recommend it. As usual, you should be in great physical condition, and be a little cautious on the final mile or so towards Bighorn Peak as the trail can get a bit loose at times.

View of the Inland Empire from the ridge between Ontario and Bighorn Peaks.

Bighorn Peak Trail Statistics:

  • Elevation Gain – 3500 feet
  • Round Trip – 12 miles
  • Suggested Time – 6-7 hours
  • Difficulty – Strenuous
  • Best Season – Spring to Fall

View towards the High Desert from Bighorn Peak.

Bighorn Peak is located in the Angeles National Forest near Mt. Baldy. To get to the Icehouse Canyon Trailhead, take the I-210 to the Mountain Ave/Mt. Baldy exit, drive 4.3 miles north on Mountain Ave (which becomes Shinn Road). Take a right on Mt. Baldy Road (the end of Shinn Road), and drive 6.4 miles and take a right into the Icehouse Canyon parking lot. On the way drop by the Mt. Baldy Visitor’s Center and pick up the free wilderness permit required for the Cucamonga Wilderness. A National Forest Service adventure pass ($5 per day or $30 per year) is required for parking at the Icehouse Canyon Trailhead.

If you plan to do this hike and have any additional questions, please feel free to leave a comment here and/or email me at 412cobrapower@gmail.com

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